Nutrition Programs

SNAP is not the only nutrition program in The Farm Bill. Below are other nutrition programs found in Title 4.

Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR)

Purpose: Provides USDA foods to low-income households, including the elderly, living on Indian reservations, and to Native American families residing in designated areas near reservations and in the State of Oklahoma. This program works in lieu of SNAP. This program is administered by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service.
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's Food and Nutrition Service's Program Page

The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP)

Purpose: Helps supplement the diets of low-income Americans, including elderly people, by providing them with emergency food and nutrition assistance at no cost. This program is administered by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service.
Funding: Increases funding by $125 million over five years and $205 million over 10 years. Congress had appropriated $318.15 million for the program in FY 2014.
History: TEFAP was created in the 1990 Farm Bill, and is the evolution of the Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program created in 1981.
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's Food and Nutrition Service's Program Page
Feeding America
Food Research & Action Center

Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)

Purpose: Supplements the diets of low-income elderly persons at least 60 years of age with nutritious USDA Foods. CSFP only operates in 39 states, DC, and through two Indian Tribal Organizations. This program is administered by the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service.
Funding: Congress appropriated $202.682 million for the program in FY 2014.
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's Food and Nutrition Service's Program Page

Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program

Purpose: To provide low-income seniors with coupons that can be exchanged for eligible foods (fruits, vegetables, honey, and fresh-cut herbs) at farmers' markets, roadside stands, and community-supported agriculture programs, via a grant program. The program is administered by state-level agencies.
Funding: Mandatory funding of $20.6 million to be appropriated annually through FY 2018. 
History: This program began as a USDA pilot program in 2001 and funded continued with the 2002 Farm Bill.
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's Food and Nutrition Service's Program Page
National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program

Purpose: Provides fresh fruit and vegetable snacks to school children throughout the day. The 2014 Farm Bill includes a pilot project where at least five states will offer frozen, canned, and dried fruits and vegetables.This program is administered by the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service.
Funding: The program is permanently funded. A mandatory $5 million to be made available for the pilot project.
History: The program was first authorized as a pilot project in the 2002 Farm Bill, with permanent authorization and funding occurring with the 2008 Farm Bill.
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's Food and Nutrition Service's Program Page

Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive

Purpose: Grant program for projects that incentivize SNAP participants to buy fruits and vegetables. These grants are administered by the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
Funding: Mandatory $100 million to be available over five years.
History: The program is created with the 2014 Farm Bill, but has evolved from the Hunger-free Community Grants. 
For More Information, Visit These Sites:
The USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture Program Page
Fair Food Network
National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition
Wholesome Wave

Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI)

Purpose: To support projects, grants, and tax credits that increase access to healthy, affordable food in underserved communities. The programs are administered by the USDA, Treasury, and Health and Human Services.
Funding: Up to $125 million is to be made available until expended.
HFor More Information, Visit These Sites:
Health & Human Services Program Page
The USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service Page
Healthy Food Access Portal

Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program

Purpose: To increase capacity for food, garden, and nutrition education; complement the work of the federal farm-to-school grants; and coordinate with the related National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) work. This program is to be administered by NIFA.
Funding: $25 million is to be made available until expended.
History: The program is created with the 2014 Farm Bill.
 

© 2014 by Siobhan Wallace. Proudly created with Wix.com

 

Disclaimer: This is an aggregated site, meaning most of the information found within is from another publicly available source. The majority of the program information can be found in the Congressional Research Service's "The Farm Bill (P.L. 113-79): Summary and Side-by-Side" report, as well as the program respective USDA page.